Statistics

Executive Summary - Matched Students - 2005/06

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Introduction

The Choice Game™ involved 960 public and parochial high school students (537 treatment and 423 control).  A 33-item questionnaire including three demographic items was administered before and after the treatment to both groups.  Pre-test/post-test data was matched; gain scores for each item were compared by group and tested for statistical significance (p < .05) using analysis of variance. Additionally, changes from pre-test to post-test in the desired response were calculated.

Program Overview

Program monitors facilitated The Choice Game™, a 9-session interactive abstinence education curriculum during the third and fourth quarters of the 2005-2006 academic year.  The Choice Game™ aims to educate young people and create an environment within communities that supports teen decisions to postpone sexual activity until marriage.

The curriculum consists of six core lessons, each 45-minutes in length which include the topics “My Family, My Self”; “Influences”; “Communication & Refusal Skills”; “STDs & AIDS”; “Alcohol, Drugs, Tobacco Use”; and “Teen Pregnancy.”

Results

Twenty-two items are identified within the full evaluation report which demonstrate a statistically significant gain in the survey instrument among the treatment group as compared to the control group. These areas include attitudes (5 items), behavioral intentions (6 items), communication (3 items), knowledge (6 items), and media influences (2 item).  Following are highlights of these results:

Question 4: I go to a family member, or a trusted adult, with concerns or questions about sex.

  • 20.2% increase (from 56.4%to 67.8%) in the desirable answer among participating students over time (p < .01)

Question 9: Would you like to see teens practicing abstinence more often in the media (TV, Radio, Movies, Magazines)?

  • 17.6% increase (from 48.9%to 57.5%) in the desirable answer among participating students over time (p = .01)

Question 12: I plan to be sexually abstinent (not have sex) until marriage.

  • 61.5% increase (from 30.1%to 48.6%) in the desirable answer among participating students over time (p < .01)

Question 14: It is not a good idea for teenagers to have sex.

  • 33.2% increase (from 41.6%to 55.4%) in the desirable answer among participating students over time (p < .01)

Question 16: Having sexual intercourse can cause a lot of stress for people my age.

  • 30.1% increase (from 57.5%to 74.8%) in the desirable answer among participating students over time (p < .01)

Question 19: Using drugs or alcohol will increase my chances of becoming sexually active.

  • 43.6% increase (from 49.5%to 71.1%) in the desirable answer among participating students over time (p < .01)

Question 23: The only 100% sure way to avoid getting a sexually transmitted disease (STD), or becoming pregnant, is to abstain (not have) from sexual activity.

NOTE: While the percentage change may seem to be only a small increase among the treatment group, this is compared to an 11.1% decrease among control students.

Conclusions

Based on the results of this evaluation report, it appears that The Choice Game™ is having an impact among participating students as demonstrated by percentage increases and statistical significance. Clearly, The Choice Game™ has met its aims to educate and support teen decisions to postpone sexual activity until marriage.

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